Digging the Scoops

Ever since we started working on Social Media – actually before we even thought of Scoop.it – we’ve realized how much content discovery and content publishing were really two sides of the same coin. Working on one is the way to enhance the other. That’s why we didn’t only want to make it easy for people with expertise and passion to curate content, but also felt we needed to help them be discovered. That’s why Scoop.it has a topic-centric model that favors expertise over fame and quality over popularity. And that’s also why we’re progressively adding new discovery mechanisms to the platform.

A couple of month ago, we introduced visual search among other improvements. The results have been overwhelming for us, both in terms of quality than in terms of volumes. Search usage skyrocketed but more importantly, this feature gave a new way to discover Scoop.it content by aggregating very nicely all results on a single keyword. A lot of great content was uncovered this way and it was fantastic to discover the quality and depth of what the Scoop.it community curates every day.

So today, we’d like to deep dive on content discovery by introducing two new features that will help users and readers dig Scoop.it content:

1. Topic Filtering

Filtering now enables any of your readers to search for specific keyword-related posts on your topic.

By typing any keyword (or combination of), they’ll get your topic filtered on the corresponding sub-topic.

Note that filtering works by searching through the posts and their content so the great news is that your readers will find keyword-related posts even though you might have not thought of tagging them for that keyword. Of course, Tagging is still possible as we think it serves a different purpose, i.e. giving your particular classification and therefore more context to your readers. Readers will see your tags through the same Filter button making it intuitive and easy for them to navigate your topic for meaningful content.

2 – Unlimited Follow View

When we introduced the Follow View, we were careful not to make it yet another stream to watch and felt overwhelmed with.

We kept it limited to one page, making it a snapshot of your interests at a given point in time. And as we don’t want you to miss anything important, we send you the daily summary with the posts having triggered the highest number of reactions.

But what a lot of you told us is that this stream was different than any other social media stream: it was about your interests. And passionate people sometimes can’t get enough of good stuff. In other words, you told us it wasn’t noise; it was signal. A lot of you wanted to be able to go beyond the 25 posts we were able to display on a page. Today, we’re now making this view infinite by letting you go to the next pages beyond the first one by simply clicking the Next button at the end of your Follow page.

More breadth, more depth, these new features enable a richer content discovery experience on Scoop.it. More importantly, it opens up new opportunities for your readers to discover your gems and keep on following your Scoop.it topics by getting an endless, rich and meaningful stream of content on their interests.

Enjoy!

  • http://www.rhodan.com.au/principal-consultant Daniel Watson

    Well done everyone at Scoop.it. Great to see you continuing to improve the Scoop.it experience for both your curators, their followers and casual site visitors.

  • http://www.rhodan.com.au/principal-consultant Daniel Watson

    Well done everyone at Scoop.it. Great to see you continuing to improve the Scoop.it experience for both your curators, their followers and casual site visitors.

  • http://twitter.com/APHumanGeog Seth Dixon

    Can’t tell you how pleased I am with these new changes.  They are great for both users and curators and I feel that it has greatly enhanced the ability to archive material without worrying that it will be buried.  

  • http://twitter.com/APHumanGeog Seth Dixon

    Can’t tell you how pleased I am with these new changes.  They are great for both users and curators and I feel that it has greatly enhanced the ability to archive material without worrying that it will be buried.  

  • http://www.scoop.it/t/web-to-store Nicolas

    Great ! Thanks
    I love the filtering functionallity
    For “NEXT”, I think I mess something, cause I always has the next 25 curated content. Is it something to activate ?

    Regards

    • http://scoop.it Guillaume Decugis

      Hi Nicolas. No there’s nothing to activate : just go to the bottom of your Follow view and you’ll see the next button. Click on it and you’ll load the next 25 posts.

  • http://www.scoop.it/t/web-to-store Nicolas

    Great ! Thanks
    I love the filtering functionallity
    For “NEXT”, I think I mess something, cause I always has the next 25 curated content. Is it something to activate ?

    Regards

    • http://scoop.it Guillaume Decugis

      Hi Nicolas. No there’s nothing to activate : just go to the bottom of your Follow view and you’ll see the next button. Click on it and you’ll load the next 25 posts.

  • Sakis Koukouvis

    I read all the article and I find this function very useful and necessary. In a second read, I noticed that you have used my scoop.it magazine “Science News” as an example in the Screen-shots! It was a pleasant surprise for me.

    • Anonymous

      That’s just because your topic is awesome! :)

  • Sakis Koukouvis

    I read all the article and I find this function very useful and necessary. In a second read, I noticed that you have used my scoop.it magazine “Science News” as an example in the Screen-shots! It was a pleasant surprise for me.

    • scoopit

      That’s just because your topic is awesome! :)

  • http://cxotogo.com/blog Marty Koenig

    I must agree, that your “Science News” is an awesome feed.

  • http://cxotogo.com/blog Marty Koenig

    I must agree, that your “Science News” is an awesome feed.