Should Brands Have Newsrooms?

Brand newsrooms are a hot new trend in marketing. To believe the hype, every brand should be staffing up with journalists and going 24/7. In reality, the model’s not right for the majority of brands.

gdecugis‘s insight:

Brian Solis wrote “every brand should become a media to earn relevance“.  And the trend for companies to partially become media companies is strong. This interesting article looks at whether this means they should have their own newsroom because they can (as Virgin’s Mobile head of global marketing Ron Faris puts it “We created our newsroom for a fraction of what it costs to create a 30-second spot“), whether they should rely on an agency or whether they should simply pass.

While I would tend to agree with Saya Weissman’s conclusions that going all the way to a newsroom isn’t appropriate for all brands, I see a larger in-between opportunity around content curation for brands. Producing unbiased, relevant and engaging content on a regular basis is not only tough: it might be impractical. Building on external sources and 3rd-party content has always been an interesting way to enlarge any discussion.

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6 Things The Smartest Brands Do To Win People Over

What marketers and Internet professionals can take away from these two examples is that the best idea always wins, not the biggest budget or the most over-the-top content.  The “best idea” is the concept that most effectively identifies the best strategic things to communicate to a target audience through the most appropriate, natural channels, and then executing the idea in a meaningful, authentic, and value-adding way. If you do this correctly, a simple 520 word editorial could have more positive impact for your brand than a $500k major conference keynote. Continue reading

It’s That Time of Year…

“A loving heart is the beginning of all knowledge.” – Thomas Carlyle

February is all about letting your loved ones know how you feel, and for us that means you.

To show our love this month, we’re lifting the topic creation limit: for free!

All you have to do is ask! Send an email to business@scoop.it and we’ll grant you access to unlimited topic creation – but only for this month, so don’t waste one minute!

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Scoop.it Unveils Newly Re-Designed Platform to Give Professionals and Business the Visibility They’ll Need to Survive in a Post-Apocalyptic Business Environment

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE [San Francisco, CA -- December 11, 2012] — Scoop.it, a leading social media and content curation platform for professionals and businesses, recently announced it’s platform redesign, elements of which focus specifically on increasing visibility for its community Continue reading

Every Company Can Be a Media Company. And should be.


“If there’s a universal truth in the digital age it’s that there’s too much content and not enough time to consume it. Naturally, a challenge this large and far reaching is creating opportunities for innovators.” writes Steve Rubel of Edelman on the new LinkedIn Tought Leaders section.

He goes on to explain how Scott Beale of Laughing Squid is a great example of using curation to become a media that serves the purpose of developing a company’s brand in the age of online media. 

The lesson here is that any company can potentially benefit by thinking and acting like a media company (…) However,you don’t necessarily need to create original content.

Great case study.


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Sharing the Best and Most Relevant Info: Common Goals In Curation and Education

Though “Curation for Education” may sound like a small niche market, we found during yesterday’s #Scoopitchat that there’s always something to learn for everyone.

We were joined by AP Human Geography professor Seth Dixon who had many very inspiring and thoughtful insights into the use of curation in the classroom. Seth has been using Scoop.it in his college classes for over a hear and a half and has found it to be his favorite piece of technology for education. Continue reading

Scoop.it Now Runs on HootSuite's Social Media Dashboard

hootsuite-logo

Social Media is easy. But only in theory.

When you get down to the practical things Social Media requires, you realize that a lot of them take time, require some special skills or are simply too complex to bother. While blogging and social networks have now been around for years, the truth is that for a lot of people, using Social Media in a professional way is still anything but a no-brainer; whether your job consists of running a business, pitching new customers, fundraising for a cause, educating students or coaching clients, it usually takes a good 100% of your time, so how can you “do Social Media” on top of that?

The key to solve this includes working on smarter workflows. At Scoop.it, for instance, we realized that having a suggestion engine combined with a bookmarklet for 1-click publishing greatly helped our users. And by adding features like the connections to the social networks they wanted or the ability to rescoop one another’s content, we have taken – and continue to take – steps towards making the whole Social Media Publishing workflow much simpler.

HootSuite is another company that has worked extensively on this workflow problem. By combining monitoring and cross-posting, they’ve built one of the most popular Social Media platforms to date with millions of professional users.

We’re therefore thrilled to be partnering with HootSuite today and to introduce the Scoop.it App for HootSuite. From now on, HootSuite users can combine the powerful stream layout that enables them to monitor various sources of content at once with Scoop.it’s easy content curation capabilities. This means more relevant content but also more visibility for this content when it’s published to your Scoop.it pages, whose topic-centric nature drives on average 3 clicks per visitor and greater discovery from Social and Search. Scoopiteers who already leverage topic-centric content curation to develop their visibility online can now diversify their sources of content by using HootSuite to monitor various content streams, including the topics they follow on Scoop.it or some specific Scoop.it searches to closely monitor their interests.

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