The decay and fall of guest blogging for SEO

Okay, I’m calling it: if you’re using guest blogging as a way to gain links in 2014, you should probably stop. Why? Because over time it’s become a more and more spammy practice, and if you’re doing a lot of guest blogging then you’re hanging out with really bad company.

Guillaume Decugis‘s insight:

The head of the Google Webspam team has spoken: guest blogging is now on the hook and won’t be an SEO strategy you can rely on in 2014.

Following the demise of massive link building (which now can have adverse effects), this is another strategy once recommended by traditionnal SEO consultants that disappears as part of Google’s strategy to fight spam, cheap SEO tricks and promote great quality content in search results. The more Google Search evolves, the more it relies on new criteria such as social signals to promote quality content.

What this means is there’s no way around this simple truth now: to come up in search results, you need to publish good quality content and add value – either through great original content or carefully curated quality pieces. And in the race to publish great content frequently, it’s likely you will find the latter very useful.

See on www.mattcutts.com Continue reading

Social Network Connections Glitch: Explained

We’ve received some messages from users facing a bad experience with social network connections on Scoop.it; a fairly colorful collection a messages in fact, ranging from rather engaging ["Dear Scoop.it, can you please explain"], typical of Scoop.it community’s style, to less constructive but quite clear nevertheless ["Go f****"].  It’s become clear that something went wrong here. Something that deserves to be investigated, explained and remedied.

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Integrating with LinkedIn Company Pages – the Untapped Opportunity for SMBs (Study Results)

Several studies have shown that small and mid-size businesses massively use social media as a digital marketing tactic. But at Scoop.it we wanted to take it a step further: how do small and mid-sized businesses use social media? What are their key opportunities? Over the past few months, we surveyed more than 3,000 SMBs: some within the Scoop.it user base, some outside of it. We asked questions, collected behavioral data and discovered intriguing findings which we plan to release in several parts – the first of which being in this SlideShare presentation.

The first lesson we learned is that LinkedIn Company Pages seem to be a major opportunity not yet leveraged by many SMBs. Though LinkedIn is THE business social network, SMBs still don’t see their future on LinkedIn and prefer to invest their time and effort in Facebook and Twitter. Interestingly, this is not because they don’t see the value: the large majority (67%) understands that LinkedIn is a great fit for them, but they simply don’t have the time nor the content they need to take advantage of LinkedIn Company Pages as an important marketing opportunity. Additionally, they lack ways to measure the impact their LinkedIn campaigns or content would have on their digital marketing strategies.

So today, we’re happy to announce that we’re introducing a solution to this problem by integrating LinkedIn Company Pages as a sharing option within Scoop.it… Continue reading

11 Interests, 12 Curators, 13 Topics

In case you hadn’t realized (or been on social media all day), today’s date is quite fun. It’s November 11th, 2013, also known as 11/12/13. Did you know that a couple even got married at 9:10 am, on live television?

For the sake of being extra cheesy, and a little bit due to not wanting to miss out on the date-related fun, I found this to be the perfect opportunity to showcase some of the amazing things you can find on Scoop.it. With the recent addition of Interest categories, discovering fascinating content is easier than ever, and connecting with likeminded individuals to build communities of interest is extra fun.

In that spirit, I present to you 11 interests / 12 curators / 13 topics that you might not have found before on Scoop.it.
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Two years sharing ideas that matter to 100 million people


As Scoop.it turns two today, we are excited to share a great milestone: we’re only a few weeks away from reaching 100 million cumulated unique visitors on the platform! That’s right: 100 million different people have been to Scoop.it to discover the awesome content of our amazing community of curators. How much content you ask? Well, a few months ago we counted 50 million curated pieces.

When we started working on Scoop.it, the horizon wasn’t that far. Out of a failed project, we needed to be quick to apply the lessons that we had learned. Continue reading

Sticking to our values and news for Scoop.it customer and community support

Here at Scoop.it, we have a set of values that we measure all of wins and defeats against. We ask ourselves — “does the spec for this release support our values and mission or are we just trying to be fancy,” or “was this decision made to further what we think is best for the community based on our own DNA?” And sometimes, that means making tough decisions. Continue reading

The Newest Version of Scoop.it: Welcome to the Meritoc[u]racy

1.  Why sharing ideas that matter, matters

We built Scoop.it to make it easy and rewarding to share ideas that matter.

Ideas matter: they make all of us, individuals, businesses and societies, progress. Sharing ideas is equally important as creating them: it honors the creators; it enriches the recipients; and it also benefits the “passers”, who enhance their reputation through propagation of wisdom.

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Inspiration wants to be free — news for iPad users

Back in 2011, just a few months after the iPad launched, I was asked to moderate a panel on the future impact of the iPad. What new behaviors will it generate? What impact will it have on existing industries? As a way to do some research, I created a Scoop.it page (that I kept updating since then) and started to dig deeper on studies that had been published, experiments that had been made, etc… What struck me from this – and the panel discussion thereafter – was how much everyone discounted the creation capabilities of the iPad. At the January 2010 keynote, Steve Jobs himself defined the iPad as a device that would be better than a smartphone or a computer for browsing the web, doing email, watching photos or videos, listening to music, playing games and reading eBooks. In short, a device specialized in consuming content. Not creating any. Continue reading