This is the most popular post you’ll read all day

In a recent post for The Atlantic, Derek Thompson investigates what drives people to read content online. As a writer for a popular news site, it’s of interest to Thompson to find out what people are clicking on and why when navigating through the endless amount of web content available. Though it sounds like a boring study of analytics at first, his findings and references are actually super interesting.

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Twitter and its impact IRL

Here in the US, the Dow recently tumbled almost 150 points in a “flash crash” caused by widespread digital panic. What was the cause of this panic? Twitter.

The bigger story is that someone hacked the official AP Twitter handle and tweeted a false report of a terrorist attack on the White House, which claimed that the President had been injured in said attack. This is significant in the grander scheme because the Dow essentially measures the health of the US economy and a hit of this magnitude means lots of people (deserving or otherwise) needlessly lost a lot of money in nanoseconds. Continue reading

The only web services that don’t change are the dead ones

Some of you have asked, “How do we decide on making changes on Scoop.it?” We felt that this is an interesting opportunity to share the answer openly.

First, let me start by saying that it’s a process that has evolved to become much more complex now that millions are using Scoop.it every week. In the beginning, we were able to let our vision and intiution guide us, but now we have a responsibility to you, the Scoop.it community, who have decided to use this service as your content curation hub on a daily basis.

Sometimes decisions are easy: when you asked for curated newsletter capability on our feedback forum, it was just a matter of planning this together with the right resources and partner. It can take some time (bear with us…) but the decisions are simple. Sometimes,  it’s a question of vision: we have strong values and a vision for what we feel content curation and the interest graph should stand for, and that of course. continues to guide us just like we recently experimented by launching Read.it.

At the UX (user experience) level though, this can be more difficult: not so much for the inspiration and the big ideas but for the little details that can have a big impact. Should this button be at the top or the bottom? Left or right? Should we give users one main option and a bunch of secondary ones or should we highlight the three that are the used most often? Did we make that feature visible enough? Or is it too prominently displayed and annoying? A lot of these questions don’t have good or bad answers you can easily guess: you have to try out to find out. Continue reading

Announcing our newest offering — Read.it!

For the past few months, the team here at Scoop.it has been focusing on “taking curation beyond the platform,” our own little bit of rebellion against computer-only or anti-mobile curation tools and platforms. We launched a fantastic re-design of our iPhone application, integrated Scoop.it with MailChimp to easily take your curation to the world of email, and some other great stuff too.

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Time for next-generation interest-based content curation? RIP Google Reader

TechCrunch: Google just revealed plans to shut down eight of its services as part of what it’s calling an ongoing spring cleaning effort. Some of them are pretty arcane, but among TechCrunch writers, anyway, we’re pretty bummed to see that Google Reader will be shut down on July 1.

Here’s my take on it. Continue reading

Scoop.it Content Curation, Unchained

We’ve been thinking here at Scoop.it about the mobile and social revolutions and how we can help make the curation process a seamless part of your day. We think that the most interesting reading and content consumption happens during the “in between” moments these days — on the bus, during breakfast, etc — instead of during typical 9 to 5 hours, which has been the case historically. Instapaper recently released a study of reading data collected for over 100 million articles, which shows the majority of mobile content being consumed has actually shifted to between 6 pm and 9 pm. They also released data showing that there are very specific spikes in content consumption specifically via iPhone:

  • 6am – Early morning, breakfast
  • 9am – The morning commute, start of the work day
  • 5pm – 6pm – End of the work day and the commute home
  • 8pm – 10pm – Couch time, prime time, bed time

Based on compelling data like this and feedback from our community, we believe that the future of curation is mobile. We’ve made some awesome changes to the iPhone app to make your job as curator easier and your mobile curation more effective. It shouldn’t be a chore to feed your social channels interesting content while you’re on the move, and we are working to unchain your curation experience and make it even more effortlessly flexible and mobile. Continue reading

It’s That Time of Year…

“A loving heart is the beginning of all knowledge.” – Thomas Carlyle

February is all about letting your loved ones know how you feel, and for us that means you.

To show our love this month, we’re lifting the topic creation limit: for free!

All you have to do is ask! Send an email to business@scoop.it and we’ll grant you access to unlimited topic creation – but only for this month, so don’t waste one minute!

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