Are knowledge-sharing institutions showing too much bias?

Our knowledge sharing institutions of today are beginning to “humanize,” to focus more of their resources on creating readable, shareable media than on reporting cold, hard facts, simply to stay relevant and on top of peoples’ online radars. To make facts more palatable, many medias will interpret ideas with respect to their own unique brand Point-of-View, one only has to consider CNN versus FOX news here in the USA. But, do institutions who stand and a major knowledge source for world readers have a responsibility to keep bias out of their findings? Is “fact omission” or “spin” an appropriate way to interact with vital facts? Or, as I seem to see it, has major marketing technique got its claws too far into our knowledge sharing institutions and our own lives (because, really, we as readers are the ones who perpetuate this problem). Continue reading

Blogging for Dummies (and the time constrained)

When you hear the word blogger, what image comes to mind?  A sacred group of people anointed by the All Mighty with special powers who unleash their acerbic editorial tongue lashing from 40-story skyscrapers in major cities around the world?  Or is it men and women in pajamas scattered across the country eating cereal while pontificating on vacuous subjects?  Maybe it’s paparazzi celebrity stalkers with 50MM zoom lenses camping out in a rental car waiting to assault a model cheating on her husband with a sports star.

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The Miley Cyrus Effect: Leveraging Current Events in your Content Strategy

Recently, I’ve noticed a spike in the rate at which pop cultural current events get picked up in both major and minor media. A quick google search for “Miley Cyrus VMA” yields a shocking 71,600,000 results, many from massively influential media sources, such as CNN, the Huffington Post, and Mashable. Many of these sites don’t even include a commentary or any original content at all, choosing instead to simply re-post the notorious video. I also recently came across this post, where the author was so frustrated by the lack of views on his other, much more brilliant content, that he falsely labeled an article with “Miley Cyrus,” simply to get his content in front of people.

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The Power of Brands: a 67000% Return in One Day & 3 Tips to Make your Personal Brand the Next Apple

I’m a child of Descartes. I grew up in a rational world where logical thinking was the best weapon against ignorance, the right way out of dogma, and I still think today that it’s a decent objective.

I had believed in rational behavior when it came to my credit card, too. I had never considered lining up for two hours (let alone two days) for the privilege of buying an expensive phone bearing a fruit logo. At least, not because of the fruit logo. I had believed that specifications, performance, price and ROI should be essential contributors to my buying decisions just as math, physics and other sciences are essential contributors to my understanding of the world.

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5 Ways to Rethink Corporate Knowledge Sharing

The quest to effectively share knowledge within a company is one that still appears elusive.  How do you keep on top of your competitors’ developments?  How to do you monitor articles that mention your brand?  How do you make sure your teams get the information they need to make decisions and to learn?

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The Like economy: how social gratitude affects content efforts

Studies have shown that our brain reacts positively to our content being “liked” or shared on social media. Social gratitude, and notoriety among a peer group, are really the only reasons individuals post content to social media. If no one likes your post, it even can bring you down, or make you feel like no one cares. This is especially prevalent among the youth, with 52% of the teenage Facebook users of the iGeneration (born in the 1990s) clicking “like” daily or even several times a day. Generation Y were a close second with 45% daily “like” clicks, followed closely by 32% of Gen Xers and 24% of Baby Boomers. Continue reading

Becoming a Brand Journalist by Finding Stories from Within Your SMB

Let’s start out by addressing the giant elephant in the room. Yes, brand journalism is one of the most recent buzzwords to have taken over the world of Internet and content marketing. A brand journalist has been defined in many ways; from “one who tells journalism-style stories about a company that make the reader want to know more,” to “one who records what happens to a brand in the world and creates communications that, over time, tell the story of the brand.”

Chances are, your startup or SMB is unlikely to find a specialized brand journalist, let alone one you can afford. This leaves most businesses between a rock and a hard place. How will you be able to supplement your traditional content marketing with brand journalism that tells interesting stories and keeps your audience interested?

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OK, Glass — inspire me: a post about the positive impact tech has on our lives.

I recently got back from some travels, and as I walked around Germany, Italy, and my hometown near Washington, DC., I could not help but think about my relationship with technology and how it has evolved throughout the years. Living in San Francisco and working in Silicon Valley, I often forget that other cities are not as inspired by technology. Not so long ago, I too did not quite comprehend how technology could and would change my life.

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Two models of success for European startups | Tech Cocktail

In the 18th century, the French philosophers invented l’esprit critique. Centuries later, it seems we French people value criticism over a lot of things – such as enthusiasm, for instance.

 

theclairbyrd‘s insight:

Editor’s Note: While not directly inline with this blog’s editorial scope, this guest article on Tech.co from our CEO, Guillaume, is an interesting piece of thought leadership to keep in mind when you are considering starting your own business. There is no “perfect place” or “holy grail” of locations to start your company — regardless of how pratical or crazy your idea may be. 

At the end of the day — focus on what you want to create and what market that creation fits the best into. That’s the place you should be. 

See on tech.co