The Content Marketing Blog

How to get more return on investment from content


The Big Problem With Facebook's Graph Search: Privacy Constraints | Fast Company

“If the future of search is likely to be social, the future of social is likely to involve more search.”

This is a post I wrote for Fast Company on the conflicting tension I immediately saw following the launch of Graph Search by Facebook. Facebook’s new search tool will either have to remain private, resulting in limited, biased content, or make private data accessible to search.

Here’s why.

See on

Read More

Twitter as a tool for learning

Social media often gets a bad rap for being a driving force behind people falling out of touch, neglecting in-person relationships, and reducing productivity for people around the world. Naysayers blame it for shorter attention spans and proliferation of bad grammar, and the most vehement of those naysayers believe that social media has led to privacy being a thing of the past. To be fair, there have been many times where I’ve been trolling my Twitter feed only to be thoroughly horrified by TMI moments and tHingz Speld lIKE THIZ.

Read More

Students of All Ages Must be Trained to Curate Content

“Students of all ages must be trained to search, select, qualify (and therefore disqualify), then enrich with their own thought, and then use and share information.” – Marc Rougier, Co-Founder,

From Daily Edventures:

Educators often see the Internet as a double-edged sword. While the Web provides nearly limitless information on any given topic, that information is often unfiltered, unedited and unfocused. That’s where Marc Rougier and his company,, come in. While their tools were originally created to help marketers and entrepreneurs increase their online visibility, the company quickly discovered that teachers and students found the curation tool invaluable.

“Since the explosion of Web 2.0,” Rougier says, “we live in a world of information overload: everyone has become a producer of information.” This abundance of information, according to Rougier, has generated a double problem: “If everyone can speak, to whom should I listen?” (a problem of qualification of information — extracting the signal from the noise), and “If everyone can speak, how can I get heard?” (a problem of acquiring visibility, reputation, and a voice).

Here, the mission is to get students aware of the importance of information management — to let them really touch, first hand, the challenge of qualification and organization of data – whatever their subject of study. We live in a world of information abundance and (almost) information democracy. Yet, if we are not prepared for it, we can be force-fed by a very small amount of data (a unique video seen a billion times…) and even by false information, and let a vast amount of valuable data be wasted. Students of all ages must be trained to search, select, qualify (and therefore disqualify), then enrich with their own thought, and then use and share information.

See on

Read More

7 Ways To Make Your Brand Look Terrible On Social Media

Ally Greer‘s insight:

2012 was quite the year for social media blunders. From American Apparrel offering a 20% coupon to help the victims of Hurricane Sandy deal with their “boredom,” to #McDStories to the worst hijacked hashtags, some brands proved that they need more than a few tips.

It’s time to be frank. Here are 7 ways to make yourself look terrible on social media. (Pro tip: you’re not supposed to do them.)

See on

Read More

Thinking Differently About New Year’s Resolutions

The New Year’s resolution is such an interesting, inspirational concept. The fact that we’ve institutionalized a specific time of year to be introspective and reflect on how we lived our last 12 months of life is a pretty incredible thing — definitely an institution to respect and make a priority as we ring in 2013. Identifying which things in our lives were good and which things could have been improved should be top-of-mind when the clock strikes its respective 12:00 AM across the globe on January 1st, 2013 and signifies the start of a brand new year. I’ve always felt that a “resolution” may not be the most effective use of the insights we glean from reflecting on our last year. I’ve always felt pressure to do more things, or different things, or change my life trajectory in a significant way with each list of resolutions I’ve written. In 2012, it was “learn a new language,” in 2011 was “read at least 30 books,” and 2010 was “get a job that doesn’t suck.” I’ve always felt compelled to make a firm decision to either do a new thing or break some terrible old habit.

Read More

Be Discovered in 2013 via Content Curation and the Interest Graph

My name is Ally Greer. I’m a marketer with expertise in content marketing and curation. You’ve probably never heard of me.

With over 500 million users on Twitter, 175 million on LinkedIn, and over a billion on Facebook, you probably haven’t heard of most people on the Internet. The bad news is that this also means most of those people probably haven’t heard of you either.

That said, I’m certainly not here to tell you how flooded the Internet is and discourage you from jumping into the information pool. In fact, I’m telling you to do the exact opposite. Although it isn’t likely that all 500 million people on Twitter will be following you by the time you’re finished reading this (or ever), there are a few ways to look what we call “information overload” right in the face and use it to your advantage.

In a digital world characterized by an overwhelming amount of noise, everyone is struggling to find relevant content from people and brands with an expertise on a specific subject. Content curators are the ones who step up to the plate.

According to Michael Brenner, cofounder of Business 2 Community, content curation is the process of identifying relevant content for your audience from multiple sources, modifying or editing that content to reflect the needs of your audience and delivering the content to the appropriate channels of distribution.

The truth is, you’re probably already curating content. Do you share links on Twitter? Do you Retweet content that you find interesting? Do you write blogposts referencing content that’s been created by others? If so, you’re a curator. You know what you’re talking about, you know where the best content on your topic of expertise is, and you put it together for the world to see. But, the question still looms: if no one knows who you are, how will they find it?

Read More

7 Reasons to Love the New

You may have noticed (or maybe not, because they are so awesome to use) that we recently rolled out some big changes to the platform.  Firstly, don’t panic. Secondly. you’re going to love them. We had you (and your success online) in mind while designing them, and we’ve done some intense testing with the new features and the beta testers are just as excited as we are. All the changes make the platform better — allowing you to accelerate and grow your visibility on the web and truly shine.

The changes are all awesome; giving you more control over the look and feel of your topic pages, deeper access to your social networks and more seamless connections between your various social properties.

Read More

The end of fame (as we know it)

I gave this talk at TechWeek L.A. (where else on such a topic?) last week as I felt the new social media evolutions, particularly the rise of the interest graph, are making things move quickly on that subject.

Why do we remember famous people in history? How? How about today’s celebrities? And how are the Internet and the Social Web changing that now?

A look at the fame creation process tells us it is indissociable from the media creation process, which has been deeply impacted by new information technology. The Andy Warhol prediction is probably no longer valid and we need to rethink fame in the context of a distributed Internet network which more and more becomes topic-centric and no longer people-centric.

See on

Read More

90% of Marketers Know the Importance of Content, but only 38% Have a Strategy

According to a recent survey conducted by Econsultancy, 90% of respondents (1,300 marketing professionals) believe that content marketing will continue becoming increasingly important within the next year, but a surprisingly low 38% of them actually have a content strategy in place.

It’s hard to say that a day goes by for marketers without hearing, talking, or reading about some type of content marketing strategy. This is clearly demonstrated by the 73% of respondents who believe that brands are becoming publishers. Why is it, then, that only 38% of companies currently have a defined content marketing strategy and only 55-58% say that they are planning one?

After seeing these numbers, I thought of a few reasons why companies wouldn’t have a content marketing strategy, and why those reasons are not acceptable excuses.

Read More

Don’t Be a Cause without a Context

Don’t Be a Cause without a Context
Context is always the key, especially for our community of curators that know that it allows instantly to give more visibility to your passion, expertise or voice.

We know that the digital environment created a very powerful context. The web has become the world’s largest pulpit.

Read More

The Right Time to Be Heard Should Be Yours.

The Right Time to Be Heard Should Be Yours.

Sometimes, you see very accurate advice on how to be sure you post “at the right time”, on social media networks. Apparently you should not talk when you want to, but when the web is ready to listen.

I don’t buy it. I think it should be the opposite: you should share when you want to, when it’s a good time for you, without worrying that nobody is going to hear you. The real time web is awesome because it keeps me in the know immediately. But it’s not the only rhythm. You cannot follow everything going on at the same time in the world, sometimes you just want to save something for later when you will have more time. Yes, later. I know it’s maybe a bad word in the State of Now.

Read More

Facebook Won't Rule The World After All

Tech needs villains.

We had Microsoft for a while, Google for another. These days, it’s Facebook. According to some, Zuckerberg is not only after exposing publicly our most private data but he’s also into privatizing the Web to make it a part of Facebook: replacing Web sites by Facebook pages, email by Facebook messages, and so on. Some are worried. It’s true that Facebook’s growth is impressive. And more importantly its usage is massive. Even financials are amazing, with revenue well above a billion dollars from advertising and virtual goods, while social commerce could still bring huge additional opportunities.
Yet, I don’t think Facebook has it all. I know it’s massive but because of that we tend to overlook where it fails.

Read More

Curation and Education

We know that many institutions are having to rethink themselves in this Internet enabled world. Government 2.0 is already a notion that officials are trying to fully grasp and explore, even if the dilemma between the open dialogue that the web implements and the nature of a state’s responsibilities make a balance hard to find.

Read More

Content Farm’s screwed-up business models, the Human Web and the end of the SEO domination?

This post has been written by Guillaume Decugis,’s CEO, and has been published on Business Insider

A little more than a year ago, Wired Magazine published a story on Demand Media describing in details how what’s now being called Content Farms worked. It looked brilliant. No more articles produced in the vague by journalists with no idea of who would be interested in reading them. Demand Media had it all figured out: analyze Google and you’ll not only know what people are interested in reading about, but also in what companies are interested in advertising about.

But Demand Media and Content Farms didn’t stop here. They’ve pushed further the industrial rationalization of the media business: now that you know what content to produce, get it done fast and cheap by starving freelancers. And recruit SEO Top Guns to make sure your sites rank first in Google. No need for quality content produced by well-paid journalists: if you know how to perform search engine optimization, your low quality, rapidly-produced video or “article” will top Google’s results and dwarf playing-by-the-book regular media’s traffic.

If you pushed the model further, it was like imagining the future of media being a content factory (Demand Media and the likes), distributed by a search algorithm (Google Search) and monetized by an advertising factory (Google AdSense).

The Matrix.

And it might actually happen…

What’s interesting to me is that it might not. For a number of reasons and trends we start to see emerge.

Read More

Why this could be the moment for the curators

Over the past few months, there’s been an interesting number of new developments with regards to Web Curation, following several predictions that this would be come a hot topic or even a “billion dollar opportunity“.

What’s this all about ?

A definition I like for web curation is Rohit Bhargava’s : A Content Curator is someone who continually finds, groups, organizes and shares the best and most relevant content on a specific issue online.

Read More