The Scoop.it Content Marketing Blog

How to get more return on investment from content

Ideas reign supreme — We raised 2.6 M and hired an ace new VP to continue molding the web’s content into ideas that matter

Why are we here?

For a long while, the Scoop.it team has had a vision that fostering ideas, molding existing content into more valuable forms, and sharing knowledge with their communities of interest is what our platform can do best. Recently, after many conversations and interactions with our community, we realized that these values and behaviors were being adopted by more and more users across the platform. As a team, we immediately resonated with these users and we’re excited to be seeing our vision become more and more concrete as time passes.

Read More


Learning to recognize your expertise, especially as a woman

Editor’s Note: At Scoop.it, we are equal opportunity and support learning and  entrepreneurism of all stripes. This article is written with a female audience in mind, but we believe the core messages and takeaways apply to all people. 

Women start businesses at one-and-a-half times the national average. And, although women now comprise roughly half of American workers and earn nearly 60% of university degrees,1 only 24% of the people heard or read about in print, radio and television news are female.

Read More

Tech tricks that let you learn from your audience

Building a relationship with your target audience takes a lot of work. Over time you eventually get an idea of what they want and what makes them tick. While this level of networking can eat up a lot of time, it’s definitely worth it when you mold your brand into something all your audience loves because you know them so well.

Read More

Mini infographics to share!

Myself and the Scoop.it team have begun creating miniature infographics (affectionately called “micrographs” at the office) based on Scoop.it user data we’ve discovered over the past few months. These are absolutely free for you to save, enrich with your own thoughts, and share with the entire world.

Read More


The day Google Reader died.

Today, Google Reader was officially turned off. While not a fundamentally game-changing action on its own, when coupled with several other trends in the online content landscape such as the rise of curated media (Upworthy, etc) and the development of new curation and reading tools (Flipboard and our own Read.it), we can infer that a major shift is coming our way, and coming fast.

Read More


3 tips for reaching to the right people

As you’ve undoubtedly discovered during your time as a professional, it’s not just about what you know — it’s also about who you know. There are people out there that can make your dreams come true by exposing you to the world in ways you never imagined or give you access to markets you didn’t think you could reach.

Read More




5 (less traditional) ways to create and share knowledge online

The communication of knowledge and ideas is intrinsic to the human condition. Our earliest ancestors had a rich oral tradition, through which they passed on what they knew about the world, often across great distances. Our systems of communication have evolved and matured, from those oral traditions to the earliest cuneiform writings and all the way up through books and newspapers, to radio and television. With the advent of the modern age and Al Gore’s gift of the Internet, we’re now able to share our knowledge, ideas, and lots and lots of cute pictures of cats, around the world in less time than it has taken me to write this sentence.

Read More


This is the most popular post you’ll read all day

In a recent post for The Atlantic, Derek Thompson investigates what drives people to read content online. As a writer for a popular news site, it’s of interest to Thompson to find out what people are clicking on and why when navigating through the endless amount of web content available. Though it sounds like a boring study of analytics at first, his findings and references are actually super interesting.

Read More

How much knowledge is too much?

Whether you are trying to be a successful entrepreneur, parent or friend, it’s wise to calibrate your knowledge meter. How much knowledge is too much? Is there such a thing as having too much knowledge and if so, how do you know when knowing too much actually hurts you, rather than inspires you?

Read More

Operation: Integrate all the things!

A few nights ago, I was sitting on my couch about to get down with a bottle of wine and some Netflix. I grabbed my phone and opened the XBox SmartGlass app, which basically works like a virtual game-slash-remote controller. As I was mindlessly scrolling, my dude and roommate — an audio engineer — walked in with his iPad, frustrated and annoyed that this new interface app he’d downloaded allowed him to create and manipulate different sounds, but didn’t automatically sync up with his main program, or allow him to save audio files to Dropbox.

Read More



Learning to learn: the heart of reading

I was always a bookworm. In fifth grade, I was one of the only students in my class to finish every last book on the Battle of the Books competition list.

Fast forward a few years and here I am: one of those people who can’t stand the thought of reading on an electronic device simply because of the pure joy that comes from opening up a new book and turning each page as more new information is absorbed.

Read More



Can an algorithm really predict love at first sight? | citizentekk

theclairbyrd‘s insight:

I’ve always questioned the efficacy of online dating websites that use robots and math to select possible partner choices between people.

I think that online dating, at its core, probably does “work.” But I think that math and robots will always return “safe” potential pairs and takes away the potential for the magic of human chemistry to create unique and sometimes non-sensical or non-typical pairings that are incredibly successful.

Is this okay? Of course it is. But I think that taking away the human component of match-making in preference of safe bets is a mistake. In the war of people vs robots and the automation of the entire world, romance should always be organized and curated by people.

See on citizentekk.com

Read More


Learning to learn: asking questions and taking names

I went to a huge college. And by huge, I mean almost 40,000 undergrads.

By nature, this meant that I spent a lot of my class time as follows: find a seat in a lecture hall among 400 of my “closest friends,” listen to one professor in the front of the room talk for 45 straight minutes, take notes, leave, repeat.

Read More

The bankers of the knowledge economy

Curating and sharing stories should be understood as part of a knowledge economy. If stories are tribal currency, then curators are money handlers.

gdecugis‘s insight:

The world has changed and so did the economy. From an agricultural to an industrial world, we’ve now moved into the post-industrial era where knowledge is the true currency and a lot of us are knowledge workers.

In this great post, Elia Morling explains how he views content curators as playing a key role as a “money handlers, changers and lenders all wrapped into one.”

See on tribaling.com

Read More



Should social networks curate their own content? Or should users do it?

The challenge [for social networks] is to create something of permanent value for the community, to offer more than a temporary spotlight.

gdecugis‘s insight:

Austin Powell comes back on PaidContent the recent announcement by Tumblr to shut down Sotryboard and lay off the editorial team that was highlighting and curating Tumblr’s best content.

He makes a point that it’s been extremely hard for most social networks – with the notable exception of LinkedIn with its influencer program – to add value by curating its users’ best content.

I wonder whether that’s actually such a big deal.

Read More