TEDxSF on Scoop.it: Maximum Visibility

This weekendʼs TEDxSF “Alive! Maximum Living as a Human” was everything you expect from a TEDx: inspiring, surprising, moving. Scoop.it was proud to be there at the Yerba Buena Center For The Arts as a media partner. I have to confess I was very proud to see and feel how useful our platform was to spread the word before the event, to capture the atmosphere during it and keep the conversation engaged after. The TEDxSF team was a great partner as they really wanted to explore and leverage as much as possible Scoop.it especially with our latest release “Scoop.it everywhere”.

They first created their topic several few days before the event to start the discussion around TEDxSF and curate news around speakers and topics that would be presented at the conference.

TEDxSF | Scoop.it

They informed their community through their different social tools such as Twitter about the Scoop.it page:

They integrated a Scoop.it widget on to their main website (by clicking on “goodies” on our main page) allowing direct access to their topic from their blog but also allowing them to give updates and forward interesting information with just a couple of clicks without having to write entire blog entries.

They used the sharing capabilities built into Scoop.it to seamlessly share the information on via their different social networks accounts (Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, WordPress and Linkedin).

During the conference they continued linking to their Scoop.it page regularly to be sure the audience continued to be involved and keep the dialogue alive even after the event:

Their Scoop.it page is a great way to make themselves heard and be much more visually appealing than 140 characters. It was also a great resource for sharing very easily news, links and other information about the speakers, their projects and even tease the attendees on what was awaiting them. I was myself more and more enthusiastic to attend after sending suggestions and reading the page every day. When we created Scoop.it, we did not first think about using it for events like TEDxSF. We wanted passionate amateurs, experts, great contributors to talk about their passions. But when I see the great use that conference organizers make of it, it has become obvious that making an event into a sharing experience which is more and more “Alive”, as the TEDxSF crew would say, has become part of the DNA of the platform.

Events are not only keynotes and applause. They are the sharing of knowledge, Scoop.it is the perfect platform for capturing it so it becomes more accessible, visible, shareable and engaging.