Learning to learn: finding motivation with a think board

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post for the #learningtolearn series. Finding and collecting inspiration from unexpected places is an integral part of staying motivated and expanding the scope of your knowledge.

Small wins every day
There comes a time in the work day where one aims to seek out that perfectly clear, concise, motivating nugget of wisdom. Whether it be a grab at the day’s fresh air for new power, a calming quotation to alleviate the strain of work anxiety, or a simple side-step from the omnipresent monitor to attain reassurance in the ability to win the day once again. Whenever I find myself searching for that excellent tweet-sized motivation, I turn to my Think Board.

Luck is occasional but intent lasts forever
What started as a single post-it on my cubicle wall has organically grown, like an idea-amoeba, into a wide-spread reference wall filled with 41 quotes, business techniques, executive sayings, and original diction. Having tracked and physically “favorited” innovative and creative insights over the past two years, I have developed a quick-reference chart to continually motivate my work output while adding a comforting change of pace for my vision to wander during those much needed breaks.

Have a prescriptive viewpoint
Keeping this Think Board adjacent to my 24-inch monitor provides a continual reminder of the importance of Zen, proving value, winning the day, and capturing the moment. For the past three years I have sat within a team that challenges me to think creatively within a banking sector that is often viewed as number-crunching and far from the realms of amorphous idea generation and innovation. Keeping a variety of empowering slogans and business practices within the confines of the 49 square feet known as my workspace cubicle provides a window into unlocking the alter-angle against which I try to approach my work. Original thinking takes practice and recognition of opportunity, and finding the sparkplug that catalyzes these thoughts should be a regularly identifiable and usable mechanism for those looking to magnify the impact of those ideas.

Don’t allow failure to disrupt momentum
I am interested to hear how others provide daily self-motivation throughout their work days. What tools do you use to spark daily innovation and creativity? Do you have your own version of a Think Board?

Jordan Rappaport is an International Strategist for Bank of America, one of the largest financial services companies in the country. His interests include technology, entrepreneurship, and motivational techniques, and his hobbies are rooting for the Indiana Hoosiers and making witty puns. 

About Jordan Rappaport

Jordan Rappaport (@jmrappap) is a Product Development Strategist for Bank of America, one of the largest financial services companies in the country. His interests include technology, entrepreneurship, and motivational techniques, and his hobbies are rooting for the Indiana Hoosiers and making witty puns.
  • Cruciverbiste

    Thinks o lot

  • kevreadenn

    I am a 4th grade teacher and have always provided desk blotters for each of my students. These are usually used for schedules and certain procedures. I have provided some inspirational items in the past but after reading your post I am interested in expanding this to include more inspiring quotes. Just as a cup will gradually obtain the stain of the tea so will my students gradually obtain the “stain” of these inspirations. Thank you.

    • Ashlee Perry

      This is such a superb idea, thank you for sharing!!

  • Jordan

    Thanks kevreadenn! My mother is a 3rd grade teacher and is always sharing her own motivational tactics with me as well. As adults we can always remember the positive teaching influences from our youths! Thank you for the great comment and best of luck in “steeping” your students in knowledge.

  • amit ahuja

    Your article very inspired. I read your article. It’s very interesting.

    corporate
    motivational speakers