How content curation helps social media publishing

As a social media manager, you’re probably aware of many of the pains that come with staying visible online and managing many social media channels at once. Luckily, there’s an answer to the woes of social media publishing: content curation. Here are 5 problems that social media publishers face and how content curation helps alleviate the pain.

Editor’s note: this is a guest post from Scoopiteer Jon Koob, community manager at Sculpt, who regularly uses content curation to feed his social media presence.

1. What should I post?

What do you care about? That’s the simple answer. Share your passions. When you curate content, you’re finding the best material about what you’re most interested in, and sharing it with your audience (whomever that may be). If it’s not something you care about or that you think could benefit the people who will see it, don’t post it!

Content curation also allows you to discover interesting content that you might not have found if you were searching for specific things. Curators with similar interests can connect with one another and find content on their shared interests to supplement the content they’ve been creating on said topics.

2. Switching between platforms to post the same content is a pain.

Okay, you found a great article and you want to share it with everyone. Now what? You have to manually go to every site you want, copy and paste the link, and add whatever copy you need. Wrong. Scoop.it eliminates all of that tedious work. With the bookmarklet or Google Chrome app you can simply click the “it!” button and have the option to share what you’ve found on virtually any social media platform you’re on. You could tweet your curated content, or share it from your businesses’ LinkedIn page. It’s easy, and saves time.

3. What do I share and where?

What you post on your Facebook page may be entirely different than what you post on your LinkedIn profile. You may share content on Google+ only five times a week, while you may tweet a dozen times a day. There is a difference between the platforms you post on, and you need to understand that. For instance, I share all of the music I find from my Eargasms board on Twitter, but I don’t post any music on LinkedIn. When I find an interesting story or article pertaining to psychology in social media, though, I share it through my Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn at the same time. Knowing what to share where really comes down to who your audience is for each platform. If you’re on LinkedIn to get a job, you probably don’t want to be posting how crazy your weekend was or that you’re eating a certain food. When you curate content through Scoop.it you have the option to share – or not share – your content via any and all social media outlets you’re on.

4. I want people to be able to see all of the content I’ve curated.

There are some things you share that you want some people to see, but not others. It’s perfectly fine to have different audiences. When you curate a piece of content, you have the option to just post it to one of your curated blogs without sharing it with any of your social media platforms. In some cases this may be the best choice. You can always scoop something, and then refer individual people or individual groups back to your topic. That’s the beauty of content curation platforms like Scoop.it; you have your very own information hubs with amazing content that you can refer people back to and engage with in the process.

5. Should I share things more than once?

YES. Resharing is always encouraged and a great way to get your curated content more exposure. There’s always a chance some of your audience didn’t see what you posted the first (or second or third) time. With Scoop.it, it’s easy to go into any of your topics, and click the share button again. Maybe you see someone asking a question on Twitter about something you curated a week ago; reshare your post and tag them in the social media post – it’s that easy. Social media is always going and when people scroll through their timeline or newsfeed, they may never come back. So people could easy be missing the content you shared for one reason or another; luckily you have a curated blog filled all with the content you’ve shared. By resharing your post you give everyone another chance to see the awesome content you curated.

Conclusion

Social media publishing can be a pain – between finding the right content to post, managing different platforms, and being able to go back to all of the content you’ve shared to reshare it and increase views, it’s hard to find one solution to all of the issues that could arise. However, content curation begins to lessen the stress of difficulties like content discovery, indexing, and cross promotion.

What tips would you add about using content curation to feed your social media presence?

About Jon Koob

Interested in happiness and will power. Passionate about connecting with people, creating relationships, and sharing stories. Psych major at the University of Iowa. Community Manager at Sculpt (@WeAreSculpt).