Scoop.it introduces the Scoop.it Score

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“Quality is not an act, it’s a habit.” -Aristotle said.

What makes your topic more relevant than any filter or aggregator? Your insights, your point of view, your editorial choice. In short, your personal engagement in the content you curate.

Scoop.it was born from the strong belief that human curation is truly different from automated aggregation or algorithm-powered filtering and creates great value to the Internet.

Curators are becoming the gatekeepers controlling the overflow of online content.

We knew we were building a community when the expectations of our users met our vision: The Scoop.it community is relying more and more on qualitative criteria to explore and dig into topics. Curators know their mission is to go beyond collecting content on a specific subject and engage more and more in personal perspective and context. They want to offer a vision and intelligent content – they want to provide their audience with relevance and insights. That is what the “humanrithm” we have advocated since the beginning represents as well: Curators add quality.

Indeed, we have always encouraged our users to focus on quality: to select only the most relevant content from the web and edit it and give it a perspective.

The more qualitative your topic is, the more your audience will count on you, on what you curate and share. The quality of your topic contributes to making you a recognized expert and to the continuous growth of your audience; leading to the engagement of a virtuous circle- quality will no longer be an isolated act.

To go further in this valuable direction, we are introducing the Scoop.it Score, a new metric that indicates the excellence of your work (out of 100). It helps you, as a curator, to measure and increase your topic quality; and it helps to discriminate amongst various topics while searching, browsing or exploring topics.

This Score is calculated based on your activity as a curator (edition, tag, share, etc) and on your audience engagement (views, reactions, etc).


Your topic is a powerful resource, where transmitting what you know with passion creates more and more value everyday. Not only on Scoop.It but on the Internet.

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Guest
Guest
10 years ago

Great idea !
Thanks

Anonymous
Anonymous
10 years ago

Excellent idea and initiative, it provides a critical view of his Scoop.it !
Thanks

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[…] Scoop.it introduces the Scoop.it “Quality is not an act, it’s a habit.” -Aristotle said..What makes your topic more relevant than any filter or aggregator? Your insights, your point of view, your editorial choice. In short, your personal engagement in the content you curate…. Source: blog.scoop.it […]

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[…] Scoop.it introduces the Scoop.it ScoreScoop.it […]

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[…] Scoop.it introduces the Scoop.it ScoreScoop.it “Quality is not an act, it’s a habit.” -Aristotle said..What makes your topic more relevant than any filter or aggregator? Your insights, your point of view, your editorial choice. In short, your personal engagement in the content you curate…. Source: blog.scoop.it […]

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[…] Scoop.it Scores Curators Work: Introducing the Scoop.it Score […]

Daniel Watson
10 years ago

I am excited by my 92/100 Scoop.it Score for my Business Improvement topic.
Interested to know what more I can do to improve it and to find out who has higher scores.

Anonymous
Anonymous
10 years ago
Reply to  Daniel Watson

Hi Daniel,

You’re currently at the top: http://www.scoop.it/topic/findmore

Congrats! 🙂

We’ll publish more precise guidance to improve but right now, we want to check whether the algorithm works fine and collect feedback.

Boas Oportunidades
10 years ago

Seems like a good idea, but I think there is some potential for abuse…

Anonymous
Anonymous
10 years ago

We’ll be watching out! 😉

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[…] Scoop.it introduces the Scoop.it Score | Scoop.it Blog […]

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[…] Scoop.it Scores Curators Work: Introducing the Scoop.it Score […]

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[…] Scoop.it Scores Curators Work: Introducing the Scoop.it Score […]

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[…] Scoop.it Scores Curators Work: Introducing the Scoop.it Score […]

Laura
10 years ago

Not sure. Sounds like a popularity contest to me. The score is based on traffic more than the content in the topic. But, I think it would be tough to come up with a way to measure relevant content for each topic. Even basing it on keywords would only work partially. To me, basing a score on mainly on traffic doesn’t really say much about the quality of content being offered. 

Anonymous
Anonymous
10 years ago
Reply to  Laura

Hi Laura. Trafic doesn’t affect the score. You can have a low view count and a high scoop.it score. The point was exactly to avoid a popularity bias and have a score indépendant from it as popularity is already covered by the Views count. Of course, ideally, quality topics will gain traction and end up having both. But our point was really to create a different metric. So as we explained, we’re looking at whether the topic is updated frequently or not, the depth it has, whether or not posts generate reactions (but a lot of reactions on 1 post… Read more »

Laura
10 years ago
Reply to  Anonymous

There is no perfect format for measuring sites/ topics. If there were Google would buy them/ it. Going by reactions will work well for topics which are trending in the news or seasonal. For myself, I am not the chatty type. I work at keeping the topics active with fresh content but I will never be successful at getting a lot of reactions. I will see how the scoring goes and evolves. Kind of discouraging right now. Don’t take this as complaining. I’m choosing to be here and put in the work because I really like research and finding unique… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
10 years ago
Reply to  Laura

Thanks for all the feedback. 

Reactions are just one element of the scoring and you don’t need a lot to start impacting. 

But as you pointing every system will have its limits. We’re going to see how this one works out and if need be, we’ll adjust. 

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[…] Scoop.it Scores Curators Work: Introducing the Scoop.it Score […]

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[…] Scoop.it introduces the Scoop.it ScoreScoop.it “Quality is not an act, it’s a habit.” -Aristotle said..What makes your topic more relevant than any filter or aggregator? Your insights, your point of view, your editorial choice. In short, your personal engagement in the content you curate…. Source: blog.scoop.it […]

trackback

[…] Scoop.it introduces the Scoop.it ScoreScoop.it “Quality is not an act, it’s a habit.” -Aristotle said..What makes your topic more relevant than any filter or aggregator? Your insights, your point of view, your editorial choice. In short, your personal engagement in the content you curate…. Source: blog.scoop.it […]

trackback

[…] Scoop.it Scores Curators Work: Introducing the Scoop.it Score […]

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[…] Scoop.it Scores Curators Work: Introducing the Scoop.it Score […]

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[…] Scoop.it Scores Curators Work: Introducing the Scoop.it Score […]

Alejandromeloflorian
Alejandromeloflorian
10 years ago

Hi, First of all, congratulations for this excellent tool. A question: I have seen an “arched” disposition of the contents: How is the away to get it?
Thanks.
Alejandro Melo

Anonymous
Anonymous
10 years ago

Thanks! Glad you like Scoop.it. 

Not sure I understand what you mean by “arched'”. Could you link an example maybe?

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[…] Scoop.it introduces the Scoop.it Score “Quality is not an act, it’s a habit.” -Aristotle said..What makes your topic more relevant than any filter or aggregator? Your insights, your point of view, your editorial choice. In short, your personal engagement in the content you curate…. Source: blog.scoop.it […]

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Holdground
Holdground
10 years ago

Great insight and useful criticism. Thank you.

Francis Tierney
Francis Tierney
10 years ago

Nice idea,  need to improve on my score of 56 though 🙂

Tanguy Mignot
Tanguy Mignot
10 years ago

Keep the good work on ! I really enjoy to use your tool 🙂 Thank you

Petercan88
Petercan88
10 years ago

So as we explained, we’re looking at whether the topic is updated
frequently or not, the depth it has, whether or not posts generate [url=http://www.tuntravel.com/asia/vietnam/hotels-in-danang.html]hotels in da nang[/url] 
reactions (but a lot of reactions on 1 post don’t give you as much as
few reactions on every post – no popularity contest ;-),amount of
editing work made by the curator, and other criteria which don’t depend
on popularity

Erwan Lescop
9 years ago

Dear G. Decugis,I read carefully this blog post & your comments, and tried to understand as far as I could (N.B. my English is not native, which is btw a problem for my fellow French Scoop.it curators). You wrote : 1. “This Score is calculated based on your activity as a curator (edition, tag, share, etc) and on your audience engagement (views, reactions, etc).” : I really doubt atm…2. “Trafic doesn’t affect the score” : easy to understand why & how. 3. “We’ll publish more precise guidance to improve but right now, we want to check whether the algorithm works… Read more »

Gary Hitching
Gary Hitching
9 years ago

Dear Scoop.it Peeps, I am very disheartened by the Scoop.it scoring criteria. My score was growing slowly and reached 53 about 10-14 days ago, but has been going backwards since!  When I raised the issue via email I was told that it was probably due to a decrease in audience or not sharing any articles.  Both of these factors are not the case but my score is still dropping. I can understand a score not increasing if certain criteria isn’t met but dropping is a little alarming! I curate every day and beleive that my content is good and relevant… Read more »

Cooliosblog
Cooliosblog
9 years ago

The more effort i put in raising quality, nothing happens … if you’re not popular, nothing happens … not happy with way of ‘scoring’.

Michael Charney
9 years ago

Can you please explain the scores under my profile pic? Thanks.

Guest
Guest
10 years ago

Great idea !
Thanks

ALriXs
ALriXs
10 years ago

Excellent idea and initiative, it provides a critical view of his Scoop.it !
Thanks

Daniel Watson
10 years ago

I am excited by my 92/100 Scoop.it Score for my Business Improvement topic.
Interested to know what more I can do to improve it and to find out who has higher scores.

Guillaume Decugis
10 years ago
Reply to  Daniel Watson

Hi Daniel,

You’re currently at the top: http://www.scoop.it/topic/findmore

Congrats! 🙂

We’ll publish more precise guidance to improve but right now, we want to check whether the algorithm works fine and collect feedback.

Boas Oportunidades
10 years ago

Seems like a good idea, but I think there is some potential for abuse…

Guillaume Decugis
10 years ago

We’ll be watching out! 😉

Laura Brown
10 years ago

Not sure. Sounds like a popularity contest to me. The score is based on traffic more than the content in the topic. But, I think it would be tough to come up with a way to measure relevant content for each topic. Even basing it on keywords would only work partially. To me, basing a score on mainly on traffic doesn’t really say much about the quality of content being offered. 

Guillaume Decugis
10 years ago
Reply to  Laura Brown

Hi Laura. Trafic doesn’t affect the score. You can have a low view count and a high scoop.it score. The point was exactly to avoid a popularity bias and have a score indépendant from it as popularity is already covered by the Views count. Of course, ideally, quality topics will gain traction and end up having both. But our point was really to create a different metric. So as we explained, we’re looking at whether the topic is updated frequently or not, the depth it has, whether or not posts generate reactions (but a lot of reactions on 1 post… Read more »

Laura Brown
10 years ago

There is no perfect format for measuring sites/ topics. If there were Google would buy them/ it. Going by reactions will work well for topics which are trending in the news or seasonal. For myself, I am not the chatty type. I work at keeping the topics active with fresh content but I will never be successful at getting a lot of reactions. I will see how the scoring goes and evolves. Kind of discouraging right now. Don’t take this as complaining. I’m choosing to be here and put in the work because I really like research and finding unique… Read more »

Guillaume Decugis
10 years ago
Reply to  Laura Brown

Thanks for all the feedback. 

Reactions are just one element of the scoring and you don’t need a lot to start impacting. 

But as you pointing every system will have its limits. We’re going to see how this one works out and if need be, we’ll adjust. 

Alejandromeloflorian
Alejandromeloflorian
10 years ago

Hi, First of all, congratulations for this excellent tool. A question: I have seen an “arched” disposition of the contents: How is the away to get it?
Thanks.
Alejandro Melo

Guillaume Decugis
10 years ago

Thanks! Glad you like Scoop.it. 

Not sure I understand what you mean by “arched'”. Could you link an example maybe?

Holdground
Holdground
10 years ago

Great insight and useful criticism. Thank you.

Francis Tierney
Francis Tierney
10 years ago

Nice idea,  need to improve on my score of 56 though 🙂

Tanguy Mignot
Tanguy Mignot
10 years ago

Keep the good work on ! I really enjoy to use your tool 🙂 Thank you

Petercan88
Petercan88
10 years ago

So as we explained, we’re looking at whether the topic is updated
frequently or not, the depth it has, whether or not posts generate [url=http://www.tuntravel.com/asia/vietnam/hotels-in-danang.html]hotels in da nang[/url] 
reactions (but a lot of reactions on 1 post don’t give you as much as
few reactions on every post – no popularity contest ;-),amount of
editing work made by the curator, and other criteria which don’t depend
on popularity

erwanlescop
erwanlescop
9 years ago

Dear G. Decugis,I read carefully this blog post & your comments, and tried to understand as far as I could (N.B. my English is not native, which is btw a problem for my fellow French Scoop.it curators). You wrote : 1. “This Score is calculated based on your activity as a curator (edition, tag, share, etc) and on your audience engagement (views, reactions, etc).” : I really doubt atm…2. “Trafic doesn’t affect the score” : easy to understand why & how. 3. “We’ll publish more precise guidance to improve but right now, we want to check whether the algorithm works… Read more »

Gary Hitching
Gary Hitching
9 years ago

Dear Scoop.it Peeps, I am very disheartened by the Scoop.it scoring criteria. My score was growing slowly and reached 53 about 10-14 days ago, but has been going backwards since!  When I raised the issue via email I was told that it was probably due to a decrease in audience or not sharing any articles.  Both of these factors are not the case but my score is still dropping. I can understand a score not increasing if certain criteria isn’t met but dropping is a little alarming! I curate every day and beleive that my content is good and relevant… Read more »

Cooliosblog
Cooliosblog
9 years ago

The more effort i put in raising quality, nothing happens … if you’re not popular, nothing happens … not happy with way of ‘scoring’.

Michael Charney
9 years ago

Can you please explain the scores under my profile pic? Thanks.

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