Blogging Is Dead. Long live curation ?

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I found this article about the end of blogging by Scoot Monty very interesting. It also refers to the NY Times article here and goes back to the fundamental trends which affect blogging.

I think they’re 2-fold:

– the social aspect of blogging (interacting with people) is challenged by Facebook. it’s the β€œI don’t use my blog anymore. All the people I’m trying to reach are on Facebook.” argument.

– the content creation aspect of blogging face a new distribution system which relies on curation. Through Twitter, Facebook or new curation platforms like Scoop.it, readers click on what curators have shared rather than simply follow blogs via RSS or any other forms of direct subscription. While historically readers were loyal to a media brand, they now have much more options and are influenced by curators to decide what they read.

Ironically, this latter is a challenge that blogs share with traditional media.

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About the Author

Guillaume Decugis
Co-Founder & CEO @Scoopit. Entrepreneur (Musiwave, Goojet). Engineer-turned-marketer. Skier. Rock singer. http://scoop.it/u/gdecugis
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Anonymous
Anonymous
10 years ago

Hi! Ive seen someone defining Scoop.it as a curated blogging platform. So how does that leave Scoop.it? Dead?:) Morten Myrstad, really digging curation, Scoop.it AND blogging.

Anonymous
Anonymous
10 years ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Hi Morten! My (biased πŸ˜‰ view is quite the opposite: blogging is challenged as a social connector and on content creation. But the appetite for expression has never been so strong. Everyone wants to express themselves on the Web and has learned how to do so. And found curation is easier than creation.

That’s what Scoop.it is all about: unleashing the expression on the Web.

So very much alive and kicking πŸ˜‰

Anonymous
Anonymous
10 years ago

I knew you were alive and kicking. And loving it! But still – I am really concerned about this “content is dead/curation is king”-ideology which is tweeting around. It could really backlash on the curation practice. In your first post, focusing on the distribution (and interaction) weaknesses of the blogs, per se, I could (right now) agree. But I think curation channels, like Scoop.it, is increasing the distribution of blog posts, not the opposite! And first, the content that people are curating, have to be created. Like your post, here at blog.scoop.it…. Morten, arguing and conversating, but right now not… Read more »

Anonymous
Anonymous
10 years ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Yes: titles are provocating and often exaggerated (to me it’s another proof we live in curation age, not blogging’s anymore: rightly or wrongly titles matter more than content because that’s what makes you click or not on Twitter…). I think we agree: curation doesn’t happen if no content is created. But actually I’m not worried about creation disappearing. And yes, curation favors good creation vs bad. My point was that historically media have been building their readership through some form of subscription : whether you actually paid to receive newspaper or were just loyal to the brand, it was a… Read more »

Jonha Revesencio
9 years ago

I always tell my friends that I still blog, now with Scoop.It. Blogging doesn’t always have to be in traditional form. I agree about the easy and rather smooth syndication of posts through Scoopit. It helps increase the time spent on the site too as people get curious to browse on similar topics.

Also, not trying to nitpick but it’s Scott Monty.

myrstad
myrstad
10 years ago

Hi! Ive seen someone defining Scoop.it as a curated blogging platform. So how does that leave Scoop.it? Dead?:) Morten Myrstad, really digging curation, Scoop.it AND blogging.

Guillaume Decugis
10 years ago
Reply to  myrstad

Hi Morten! My (biased πŸ˜‰ view is quite the opposite: blogging is challenged as a social connector and on content creation. But the appetite for expression has never been so strong. Everyone wants to express themselves on the Web and has learned how to do so. And found curation is easier than creation.

That’s what Scoop.it is all about: unleashing the expression on the Web.

So very much alive and kicking πŸ˜‰

myrstad
myrstad
10 years ago

I knew you were alive and kicking. And loving it! But still – I am really concerned about this “content is dead/curation is king”-ideology which is tweeting around. It could really backlash on the curation practice. In your first post, focusing on the distribution (and interaction) weaknesses of the blogs, per se, I could (right now) agree. But I think curation channels, like Scoop.it, is increasing the distribution of blog posts, not the opposite! And first, the content that people are curating, have to be created. Like your post, here at blog.scoop.it…. Morten, arguing and conversating, but right now not… Read more »

Guillaume Decugis
10 years ago
Reply to  myrstad

Yes: titles are provocating and often exaggerated (to me it’s another proof we live in curation age, not blogging’s anymore: rightly or wrongly titles matter more than content because that’s what makes you click or not on Twitter…). I think we agree: curation doesn’t happen if no content is created. But actually I’m not worried about creation disappearing. And yes, curation favors good creation vs bad. My point was that historically media have been building their readership through some form of subscription : whether you actually paid to receive newspaper or were just loyal to the brand, it was a… Read more »

Jonha Revesencio
9 years ago

I always tell my friends that I still blog, now with Scoop.It. Blogging doesn’t always have to be in traditional form. I agree about the easy and rather smooth syndication of posts through Scoopit. It helps increase the time spent on the site too as people get curious to browse on similar topics.

Also, not trying to nitpick but it’s Scott Monty.

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