The Scoop.it Content Marketing Blog

How to get more return on investment from content

Articles by Guillaume Decugis

Interest-based Content Curation Publishing: the cure for Content Shock?

In a recent post, top content marketer and blogger Mark Schaefer scored a hit and started a big controversy by predicting the end of content marketing as we know it because of a forecasted Content Shock. With Content Marketing having been all the rage these past few years, his post made some noise generating responses and debate from many. And while a lot of people have given numerous arguments as to why he’s right or wrong – including Shel Holtz who argues that as content consumers we become better and better at filtering content through various curation tools – nobody yet has looked at the role publishing-by-curation and the interest graph played in that picture.

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5 Lessons From 2 Years of Using Email Newsletters in our Content Strategy

As a platform that helps people, businesses or organizations with their content strategy, it’s always been natural for us to use content ourselves in our communication. For a lot of companies – including Scoop.it – communicating through content means having several distribution channels – including email – and today we’d like to share a few things we’ve learned using email newsletters as a content marketing distribution mechanism.

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The decay and fall of guest blogging for SEO

Okay, I’m calling it: if you’re using guest blogging as a way to gain links in 2014, you should probably stop. Why? Because over time it’s become a more and more spammy practice, and if you’re doing a lot of guest blogging then you’re hanging out with really bad company.

Guillaume Decugis‘s insight:

The head of the Google Webspam team has spoken: guest blogging is now on the hook and won’t be an SEO strategy you can rely on in 2014.

Following the demise of massive link building (which now can have adverse effects), this is another strategy once recommended by traditionnal SEO consultants that disappears as part of Google’s strategy to fight spam, cheap SEO tricks and promote great quality content in search results. The more Google Search evolves, the more it relies on new criteria such as social signals to promote quality content.

What this means is there’s no way around this simple truth now: to come up in search results, you need to publish good quality content and add value – either through great original content or carefully curated quality pieces. And in the race to publish great content frequently, it’s likely you will find the latter very useful.

See on www.mattcutts.com

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How Content Curation is reshaping learning organizations

A framework for using Curation in a learning organisation

Guillaume Decugis‘s insight:

This excellent and very comprehensive article looks stall the aspects in which content curation is transforming organizations – from individual professional development to collective collaborative learning and communication. 

“Increasingly we are being challenged to deliver ‘more with less’ in the learning department.  Curation potentially holds an interesting answer to some of the constraints we’re facing in time and cost. Why build new content, when you can curate?”

Bill Gates once stated that in the future the way we would control information in business would determine whether we win or lose. Here’s an interesting framework to be among the winners. 

See on www.ht2.co.uk

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Can Facebook People-Centric Model Really Scale?

In 2008, Mark Zuckerberg laid out his theory about people sharing content on Facebook. “I would expect that next year, people will share twice as much information as they share this year, and [the] next year, they will be sharing twice as much as they did the year before,” he said. 

Guillaume Decugis‘s insight:

This article reminded me of my own post on Business Insider predicting that the Facebook people-centric model will see its limits. Two years and one IPO down the road, we’re exactly there: with 1,500 potential stories to show to an average user news feed every time they visit, Facebook has a tough time determining what’s really important.

Perhaps more importantly, Facebook lost its raison d’etre

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How to Turn Your Brand Into a Media


This is a talk that I gave at LeWeb 2013 and at the Cristal Festival in December.

While we’ve now seen the power of brand content, it remains very hard for even the largest brands to implement successfully. In addition, it doesn’t solve the question of how to engage an audience on a daily basis. To do so, brands have to become media.

But how?

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Two years sharing ideas that matter to 100 million people


As Scoop.it turns two today, we are excited to share a great milestone: we’re only a few weeks away from reaching 100 million cumulated unique visitors on the platform! That’s right: 100 million different people have been to Scoop.it to discover the awesome content of our amazing community of curators. How much content you ask? Well, a few months ago we counted 50 million curated pieces.

When we started working on Scoop.it, the horizon wasn’t that far. Out of a failed project, we needed to be quick to apply the lessons that we had learned.

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Inspiration wants to be free — news for iPad users

Back in 2011, just a few months after the iPad launched, I was asked to moderate a panel on the future impact of the iPad. What new behaviors will it generate? What impact will it have on existing industries? As a way to do some research, I created a Scoop.it page (that I kept updating since then) and started to dig deeper on studies that had been published, experiments that had been made, etc… What struck me from this – and the panel discussion thereafter – was how much everyone discounted the creation capabilities of the iPad. At the January 2010 keynote, Steve Jobs himself defined the iPad as a device that would be better than a smartphone or a computer for browsing the web, doing email, watching photos or videos, listening to music, playing games and reading eBooks. In short, a device specialized in consuming content. Not creating any.

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The bankers of the knowledge economy

Curating and sharing stories should be understood as part of a knowledge economy. If stories are tribal currency, then curators are money handlers.

gdecugis‘s insight:

The world has changed and so did the economy. From an agricultural to an industrial world, we’ve now moved into the post-industrial era where knowledge is the true currency and a lot of us are knowledge workers.

In this great post, Elia Morling explains how he views content curators as playing a key role as a “money handlers, changers and lenders all wrapped into one.”

See on tribaling.com

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Should social networks curate their own content? Or should users do it?

The challenge [for social networks] is to create something of permanent value for the community, to offer more than a temporary spotlight.

gdecugis‘s insight:

Austin Powell comes back on PaidContent the recent announcement by Tumblr to shut down Sotryboard and lay off the editorial team that was highlighting and curating Tumblr’s best content.

He makes a point that it’s been extremely hard for most social networks – with the notable exception of LinkedIn with its influencer program – to add value by curating its users’ best content.

I wonder whether that’s actually such a big deal.

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The only web services that don’t change are the dead ones

Some of you have asked, “How do we decide on making changes on Scoop.it?” We felt that this is an interesting opportunity to share the answer openly.

First, let me start by saying that it’s a process that has evolved to become much more complex now that millions are using Scoop.it every week. In the beginning, we were able to let our vision and intiution guide us, but now we have a responsibility to you, the Scoop.it community, who have decided to use this service as your content curation hub on a daily basis.

Sometimes decisions are easy: when you asked for curated newsletter capability on our feedback forum, it was just a matter of planning this together with the right resources and partner. It can take some time (bear with us…) but the decisions are simple. Sometimes,  it’s a question of vision: we have strong values and a vision for what we feel content curation and the interest graph should stand for, and that of course. continues to guide us just like we recently experimented by launching Read.it.

At the UX (user experience) level though, this can be more difficult: not so much for the inspiration and the big ideas but for the little details that can have a big impact. Should this button be at the top or the bottom? Left or right? Should we give users one main option and a bunch of secondary ones or should we highlight the three that are the used most often? Did we make that feature visible enough? Or is it too prominently displayed and annoying? A lot of these questions don’t have good or bad answers you can easily guess: you have to try out to find out.

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A communication revolution and the rise of mobile user-generated content

Isn’t it time for text to enter the mobile UGC (UGC) revolution?

When Facebook bought Instagram for $1B last year, some called it genius, others called it luck. But whether we think that deal made sense or not, it marked an important change in the history of the web in general and of mobile internet in particular: the rise of mobile user-generated content.

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The Big Problem With Facebook's Graph Search: Privacy Constraints | Fast Company

“If the future of search is likely to be social, the future of social is likely to involve more search.”

This is a post I wrote for Fast Company on the conflicting tension I immediately saw following the launch of Graph Search by Facebook. Facebook’s new search tool will either have to remain private, resulting in limited, biased content, or make private data accessible to search.

Here’s why.

See on www.fastcompany.com

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How Google Author Rank could change content marketing… and journalism


Here’s a little piece of SEO nerdery that affects us all: Google is using Google+ to influence search results in a big way, and brands and media organizations alike have yet to wake up to the…

gdecugis‘s insight:

Erin Griffith analyzes how the use of authorships combined with Google+ is now impacting Google search results.

This change is not new but, as she puts it, it is significant: “Google was always about the algorithm, not curation, certainly not curation through something as, well, human as a social network. The emphasis before was about what was on the page not who wrote it.

While she focuses on the new importance of authorship given by Google, what’s happening is actually a mix of a couple of things which are in my opinion equally good:

  1. Authorship
  2. Social results

#1 means that an identified, reputable author will prevail; #2 is part of the social signal that Google uses more and more to rank results and that builds on curators’ activity.

Bottom line is that – as I predicted a while ago – the age of low-quality content cheaply produced by random anonymous writers in content farms for pure SEO purposes is over. By combining a measure of the author’s influence as well as taking into account curators’ appetite for a piece of content, Google is bringing quality back in the game. Which is good for authors, curators and… readers.

See on pandodaily.com

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The New SEO Rules in a Content Marketing World


Five years ago, SEO was all the buzz. Today, it has shifted to “content marketing,” which aims to create stories humans want to read and engage with. – The above chart is a good summary of this trend.

gdecugis‘s insight:

Shane Snow makes a good summary on Mashable of the trends impacting SEO these days. We moved from a machiavellian approach to game Google to influence-based content marketing because social media changed the game as others have observed before.

The success of Social Content Curation is a good example of that trend: human sharing and curating content beat the system and become such an important trend that Google had not only to change their algorithms but also start a social network just because of that.

See on mashable.com

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The end of fame (as we know it)

I gave this talk at TechWeek L.A. (where else on such a topic?) last week as I felt the new social media evolutions, particularly the rise of the interest graph, are making things move quickly on that subject.

Why do we remember famous people in history? How? How about today’s celebrities? And how are the Internet and the Social Web changing that now?

A look at the fame creation process tells us it is indissociable from the media creation process, which has been deeply impacted by new information technology. The Andy Warhol prediction is probably no longer valid and we need to rethink fame in the context of a distributed Internet network which more and more becomes topic-centric and no longer people-centric.

See on www.slideshare.net

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Content curation: your next Social Media Marketing idea



These are the slides of my talk at the Social Media for Non-Profits conference in San Francisco today.

1. Why does Content Curation matter for marketers?

2. 7 Best practices for Content Curation

3. And great examples of NPO’s effectively using Content Curation.

Part #3 is specific to NPO’s (but might be inspiring to any Content Curator) but #1 and #2 are generic for all Content Marketers.

Photo by JD Lasica – Thanks!


See on www.slideshare.net

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Humanrithm: why data without people is not enough – and how algorithms lost the Content Curation battle

These are the slides of my talk at DataWeek 2012.

This is what is it was about: “We engineers love data and algorithms. They help create amazing things. But if and when we forget that people create data and that data can be improved by people, we will miss the promise of Big Data. It’s time we all thought of this not as social vs algorithm but as Humanrithm.

And I also took the example of Content Curation as a case study.

See on www.slideshare.net

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Peretti: Human Curation Beats SEO in the Social Web

“Jonah Peretti, a co-founder of Huffington Post and CEO of Buzzfeed, said at PandoMonthly tonight in New York that he doesn’t care about SEO anymore. He views it as a broken system that optimizes for robots, not humans.” Erin Griffith reports on Pandodaily.

Some will argue that Google is not that bad but the point isn’t there.

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Scoop those slides!


Curate SlideShare Content with Scoop.it!

Presentations work great for Curators but Curators are also great for Presentations. Whether you’re using SlideShare to upload your presentations or using Scoop.it to curate your favorite topic, learn how the new Scoop.it / SlideShare integration can help you better leverage your publishing activity.

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Remixing Digital Media, Curation & Content Marketing for all at the TechWeek Conference in Chicago

Curation is going to be a big topic at the TechWeek Conference starting this Friday 6/22 in Chicago. I’ll be speaking at two sessions related to it but there are several others worth looking at as they show how important Curation is becoming as a trend. Not just to the Social Media experts who predicted it, but now also to people and businesses everywhere.

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