About Guillaume Decugis

Co-Founder & CEO of Scoopit. Entrepreneur (Musiwave, Goojet). Skier. Gamer. Blogging without blogging here: http://scoop.it/u/gdecugis

1,000,000 people and businesses are now using Scoop.it!


Interest-based content curation was only a vision 2 years ago when we launched: in a post Web 2.0 world, we felt that more and more we are the content we publish. Whether we liked it or not, we would all need to become media – a problem for busy professionals who don’t have time or inspiration for that and whose primary expertise is often not to be a content publisher.

Since then, publishing-by-curation rapidly turned into an important trend as 1,000,000 freelance professionals, community managers, content marketers, educators, knowledge managers, thought leaders, and more are now using Scoop.it to demonstrate and share their professional expertise, develop visibility for their small or mid-sized businesses or to make the company they work for smarter. Continue reading

How to Unleash the Power of Employee Advocacy

Every one of your people can become an advocate for your organization and your brand – an employee advocate.

Guillaume Decugis‘s insight:

Excellent point made by Mike Bailey that reminds me of an argument also made by Marketo here. And exactly the trend we see happening with more and more of our enterprise clients at Scoop.it: while a lot of companies are still in a command-and-control mode with small marketing teams in charge of every aspect of outbound communication, we see a growing number of organizations realize they need to leverage their employees – and their employees social network – so that their communication becomes much more effective.

As the graph above explains, an employee sharing content to their networks has up to 20x more impact than when the brand does it (when you normalize their number of followers/friends).

Content curation plays a key role here: you not only need to create relevant and engaging content hubs for employees but they need to be easy for them to curate, share and publish from. As often, adoption is key and you need systems where employees can easily take ownership through a rewarding experience which seems to be what’s driving more and more demand to use Scoop.it internally within the enterprise.

See on socialmediatoday.com Continue reading

Can SMB’s afford the impressive ROI of Content Marketing?

Is content marketing worth it? Can your company achieve a positive ROI by investing in blogging, social media, and marketing automation?

Guillaume Decugis‘s insight:

A great compilation of studies on the ROI of content marketing from Eloqua and Hubspot. There are lots of interesting numbers which show how valuable content marketing can be in the long run: unlike advertising which costs increase with success, content marketing scales up by delivering economies of scale with lower and lower costs per lead or visitor.

Now, the caveat is that these studies focus on sizeable organizations who can afford the following investments: “According to Eloqua’s findings, a mid-sized organization should expect to spend approximately $12,000 a month and a larger-sized company could expect about $33,000 a month.”

This raises the question of the accessibility of content marketing to small and mid-size businesses. To really be the new advertising, Content Marketing needs to become accessible to all – hence the growing interest for leancontent solutions and tools. 

See on www.business2community.com Continue reading

5 lessons we learned experimenting SlideShare as a visual blog

SlideShare is a great platform for visual content and an amazing company: in just a few years, it has become the YouTube of presentations, one of the Top 150 sites in the world with an impressive 3 Billion views per month from 60 million unique visitors. Perhaps like many others, I originally thought of SlideShare as a platform to use only on specific occasions: when I had talked at a conference, when we had produced great slides worth sharing or when we had something specifically visual to communicate. I had had great experience and results but I don’t talk to conferences every day and so I sometimes felt I was missing out. And then, one night of September last year, I heard Jason Miller present at one of our #leancontent events and it became all clear: the team and I realized we could use SlideShare in a very different way – not just as a tool to recycle and share what you already created for other purposes but as a media channel that we would update on a regular basis. In a word, as a visual blog.

We decided to try it: over the next few months, we tried to publish at least every other week to SlideShare, integrating it in our content calendar alongside our blog and our Scoop.it content curations.

These are the first results after 4 months running this experiment. Continue reading

6 ways to measure and improve the ROI of Content Marketing

Content Marketing has been all the rage these past few years. We’ve heard from many speakers and influencers that content marketing is the new advertising and that “brands must become media to earn relevance”. But how do we measure its ROI and know our content isn’t just fueling some vanity metric but is actually helping our business?

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Where content curation traffic comes from and 4 ways to increase yours

Content curation is not just collecting, it’s also sharing. And whatever our motivation, we curate content to have an impact so understanding where our traffic comes from is important. During our first 2 years of existence, the Scoop.it users have published more than 50M pieces of content attracting more than 100M unique visitors so we’ve been in a great position to observe not only where this traffic came from but also what best practices had the strongest influence on it. So we’ve analyzed all the content curated, published and shared through Scoop.it. This post is about sharing these data and learnings so you can be more effective with your content curation.

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The Science behind viral stories on the Web

From the New Yorker: “When Jonah Berger was a graduate student at Stanford, in the early aughts, he would make a habit of reading page A2 of the Wall Street Journal, which included a list of the five most-read and the five most-shared articles of the day. “I’d go down to the library and surreptitiously cut out that page,” he recalls. “I noticed that what was read and what was shared was often different, and I wondered why that would be.” What was it about a piece of content—an article, a picture, a video—that took it from simply interesting to interesting and shareable? What pushes someone not only to read a story but to pass it on?”

Guillaume Decugis‘s insight:

This piece that Gregg Morris initially scooped on how some people have been putting a lot of analysis to understand how and why stories go viral: after all – as this great article points out – this was already something Aristotle was intrigued by.

The findings are interesting and I encourage you to read them as it can inform your content strategy. Keep in mind the conclusion however – which I think is great and wise: the more we understand viral content collectively, the less we understand it.

Why?

Because whenever humans are involved, martingales don’t exist for long.

It reminds me of financial markets: whenever stock information is perfectly distributed and statistical models are the same for everybody, no one really has an edge.

For content, the same that applies: when everybody’s trying to do an Upworthy-like headline, they become much less effective than they used to be.

See on www.newyorker.com Continue reading

Launching Scoop.it for Google+: authorship and posting to Google+ Company pages

While some debate whether Google+ is a ghost town or not, the search giant’s social network quietly passed the 1 Billion user mark. That’s right: 1 Billion people have a Google+ account which is 2x Twitter’s user base and only 15% less than Facebook’s. Perhaps more importantly, the +1 button is pressed more than 5 million times a day and 340 million of its users are active.

Scoopiteers didn’t need to wait for those metrics to be public to demand that we add Google+ to the Scoop.it’s sharing options: as our platform is a hub to discover, curate and share content to feed your online channels, it’s natural to offer as many distribution options as possible. So today, after integrating  with Facebook profiles and pages, LinkedIn profiles, groups and pages, Twitter and many other social platform such as Wordpress or Tumblr, we’re excited to launch our integration with Google+ with 2 new features:

  • Adding Google+ Company pages as a sharing option to Scoop.it

  • Adding Google+ authorship to your Scoop.it profile

    Continue reading

5 Ways to Increase the Visibility of Your Curated Content

I was recently asked by Bill Gasset: “how does one go about being in the recommended feed in the side panel for a specific topic?” As this is a question we frequently have, I thought I would turn my answer to him into a blog post so we can not only help other Scoopiteers benefit from it but also enrich it with your comments, ideas and suggestions.

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