Interest-based Content Curation Publishing: the cure for Content Shock?

In a recent post, top content marketer and blogger Mark Schaefer scored a hit and started a big controversy by predicting the end of content marketing as we know it because of a forecasted Content Shock. With Content Marketing having been all the rage these past few years, his post made some noise generating responses and debate from many. And while a lot of people have given numerous arguments as to why he’s right or wrong – including Shel Holtz who argues that as content consumers we become better and better at filtering content through various curation tools – nobody yet has looked at the role publishing-by-curation and the interest graph played in that picture.

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5 Lessons From 2 Years of Using Email Newsletters in our Content Strategy

As a platform that helps people, businesses or organizations with their content strategy, it’s always been natural for us to use content ourselves in our communication. For a lot of companies – including Scoop.it – communicating through content means having several distribution channels – including email – and today we’d like to share a few things we’ve learned using email newsletters as a content marketing distribution mechanism. Continue reading

The decay and fall of guest blogging for SEO

Okay, I’m calling it: if you’re using guest blogging as a way to gain links in 2014, you should probably stop. Why? Because over time it’s become a more and more spammy practice, and if you’re doing a lot of guest blogging then you’re hanging out with really bad company.

Guillaume Decugis‘s insight:

The head of the Google Webspam team has spoken: guest blogging is now on the hook and won’t be an SEO strategy you can rely on in 2014.

Following the demise of massive link building (which now can have adverse effects), this is another strategy once recommended by traditionnal SEO consultants that disappears as part of Google’s strategy to fight spam, cheap SEO tricks and promote great quality content in search results. The more Google Search evolves, the more it relies on new criteria such as social signals to promote quality content.

What this means is there’s no way around this simple truth now: to come up in search results, you need to publish good quality content and add value – either through great original content or carefully curated quality pieces. And in the race to publish great content frequently, it’s likely you will find the latter very useful.

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Maximize Your Potential by Stepping Out of Your Comfort Zone

You will often hear that those with some of the most publicized successes arrived at those accomplishments by simply out-working those around them. Jerry Rice, the all-time greatest wide receiver in NFL history, famously chased horses and caught bricks as a child to develop speed and coordination, while developing a 365-day training schedule throughout his pro career. Notable successful executives such as Tim Cook are known for their routinely early starts to their work days, while others like Marc Cuban are known for forfeiting vacation days for the first seven years of his career.

Health and work-life balance risks aside, I would never contradict that a strong work ethic, focus, commitment, and having an intense voraciousness for success will lead you down a path in the right direction. Luckily, achieving success and reaching your maximum output starts with a much simpler step, and that is in finding what I like to call The Stretch Zone.

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Social Network Connections Glitch: Explained

We’ve received some messages from users facing a bad experience with social network connections on Scoop.it; a fairly colorful collection a messages in fact, ranging from rather engaging ["Dear Scoop.it, can you please explain"], typical of Scoop.it community’s style, to less constructive but quite clear nevertheless ["Go f****"].  It’s become clear that something went wrong here. Something that deserves to be investigated, explained and remedied.

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Why You Need to be on Social Media

If you are a private citizen with no business concern at all, then there is no great need for you to be on social media. The main reason that many private citizens are on it is because it is fun. You get to communicate with your friends and complete strangers. It is also loaded with brand new content every day, including content that your friends and family have posted. It allows people to see family photographs that were uploaded by distant relatives. It also allows you to share things between friends that will make them laugh. If however you are running a website, blog, business, or all three, then it is vitally important that you are on social media.

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Freelance Writing Tips and How to Promote Your Work


Freelance writing is an incredibly rich and fulfilling career, especially if you’re passionate about writing on a particular subject or niche. It’s entirely possible to make money if you decide to become a freelance writer; in fact, it can easily become a full-time job. The only trick is that you have to treat it like one: honing your skills, dedicating set times to do your job, and promoting it. Continue reading

2014: Actions over Results

On the first work day of 2014, there is certainly no shortage of resolution lists floating around the Internet. If you’re anything like me, you probably spent some time on Tuesday night thinking about what you wanted to accomplish this year, or what you were going to change. Personally, I decided to be more assertive in all aspects of my life. Maybe you decided to be a better communicator with friends and family, or to multiply this year’s revenue by 3.
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2013: What You Read

Ahh, December. The best time of year for bloggers. The one month at the end of every year where we take the time to look back over the last 11 and – you guessed it – make lots of lists. Lists of fails and lists of wins, lists of bests and lists of worsts.

As Buzzfeed has certainly proven, everyone loves a list. Lists are easy to write, easy to read, and extremely shareable (hello, #leancontent!). But, what makes a list even more exciting is objectivity. I’m sure my list of the best albums of 2013 would be extremely different than my dad’s. There’s one thing that doesn’t lie, though, and that’s numbers. That’s why I decided to make an end of the year list based on your opinions, rather than my own. Take a look back, re-enjoy the 6 top posts from the Scoop.it blog from this year, re-share them, and if you happen to be inspired, start writing your very own post for us for 2014!

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